Category Archives: Book Reviews

Take Heed What you Read

An appropriate follow up to the post Christian Nominalism and the Christian Bookstore:

By Arthur W. Pink 

“Take heed what you hear” (Mark 4:24): the word “hear” obviously includes what is read, for that which is written or printed is addressed to the ears of our intellect. Few people today realize the urgent need for “taking heed” unto what they read. Just as the natural food which is eaten either helps or hinders the body—so the mental food we receive either benefits or injures the mind, and that, in turn, affects the heart. Just as it is harmful to listen to the rubbish and poison which is being served from the great majority of present-day pulpits—so it is exceedingly injurious to the soul to read most of what is now being published. “Take heed what you hear” and read! But let us seek to be more specific.

The only thing which is really worth calling “religion” is the life of God in the soul-commenced, carried on, and consummated solely by the Holy Spirit. Hence, whatever does not bear the impress of the Spirit’s unction, should be rejected by the Christian: for not only can unctionless messages do us no good—but what proceeds not from the Spirit—is of the flesh. Here, then, is the test which God’s children ought to apply unto all they hear, and here is the balance in which they should weigh all that they read. True, there are varying degrees of the Spirit’s unction. As it is in the natural so it is in the spiritual—there will be a varying amount of wetness from the faintest moisture of dew—as compared to the copious shower. As there had to be “salt” in every sacrifice (Lev. 2:13), so every discourse or article proceeding from the Spirit’s aid, is “seasoned with salt” (Colossians 4:6). But O how very much today is devoid of spiritual savor and flavor!

Some of God’s dear people may suppose that it would be presumptuous to set themselves up as judges of what they hear or read—but that is a serious mistake, being both a false humility, and a shirking of duty. The Apostle rebuked the Hebrews because their senses (spiritual faculties) were not developed so as to discern between good and evil (Hebrews 5:13). With as much reason, might it be termed pride for anyone to pass judgment upon the groceries or meats purchased from the stores. Others may ask, “But how are simple and unlearned souls to distinguish between the different religious publications of the day?” Very simply: in sampling your natural food how do you determine whether or not it be seasoned? By your natural taste, of course. So it is spiritually: the “new man” has a palate too! If the God of creation has given us natural palates for the purpose of distinguishing between wholesome and unwholesome food, the God of grace has furnished His people with a capacity, a spiritual sense, to distinguish between nutritious and unwholesome soul food.

“Just as the mouth tastes food—the ear tests the words it hears” (Job 34:3). Does yours, my reader? Are you as careful about what you take into your mind—as what you take into your stomach? You certainly ought to be, for the former is even more important than the latter. If you eat some material food which is injurious, you can take a purgative and get rid of the same; but if you have devoured mental food which is injurious, it stays with you! “The ear tests the words it hears.” Again, we ask, Does yours, dear reader? Are you learning to distinguish between “letter” and “spirit;” between the “form” and the “power;” between that which is of the earth and that which is from Heaven; between that which is lifeless and unctionless and that which is instinct with the breath of God? If the answer is ‘No’, then you are greatly the loser.

How many of God’s dear children listen to the automaton “letter” preachers of today, and yet find nothing suited to the needs of their poor souls! And how many are subscribing for one magazine after another, hoping to find that which will the better furnish them to fight the good fight of faith—only to be disappointed? What they hear and what they read does not penetrate and grip—it has no power—it neither breaks down nor lifts up—it produces neither godly sorrow nor godly joy. The messages they hear or read, fall upon their ear like an idle or twice-told tale—it completely fails to reach their case or minister to their needs. They are no better off after hearing a hundred such “sermons” or reading through a hundred such periodicals, than they were at the beginning! They are no farther from the world—and no nearer unto God!

It is often a long time before God’s children are able to account for this. They blame themselves; they are exceedingly loath to say, “This message is not of God.” They are afraid to act in the spiritual, as they do in the natural, and condemn and discard that which is worthless. While they feel a lack of power in the sermons they hear, or the articles they read, and while their souls steadily get dried up like a potsherd—they are slow to realize that this is the inevitable effect of the unctionless preaching they listen to, or the unctionless literature they read; and that such dryness and leanness of soul is inevitable—by their association with unhumbled and empty professors. But in due time God opens their eyes, and they see through the flimsy veil and discover that both the sermons they hear, and the literature they read—are only the product of a dead profession!

Ah, it is a great thing when once the Holy Spirit teaches a soul—that it is power which is lacking from the lifeless preaching and lifeless articles of dead professors. It is power which the renewed soul seeks—a message which has power to search his conscience, to pierce him to the quick, to write it upon his heart; a message which has power to bring him to his knees in broken-hearted confession to God; a message which has power to make him feel that he is “vile”; a message which has power to drive him to Christ, for the binding up of his wounds, for Him to pour in “oil and wine,” and send him on his way rejoicing. Yes, what the renewed soul longs for (though at first he knows it not) is that Divine message which comes to him “not simply with words—but also with power, with the Holy Spirit and with deep conviction!” (1 Thessalonians 1:5).

Sooner or later, every Christian comes to value “power,” and to count as worthless, whatever lacks it. It is by Divine power, that he is taught in his own soul, by which he is made to feel acutely his sinnership, his carnality, his beggarliness. It is Divine power working in his heart—the same power which brought Christ again from the dead (Eph. 1:19, 20)—which draws his affections unto things above and makes his soul pant after God “as the deer pants after the water brooks” (Psalm 42:1). It is this Divine power working in him which reveals to his burdened spirit the Throne of Grace, and causes him to implore mercy and to seek grace “to help in time of need.” It is this Divine power working in him, which makes him cry “Make me walk along the path of Your commands—for there I find delight” (Psalm 119:35).

Those who are partakers of this Divine power (and they are few in number) can never be satisfied with a powerless ministry, either oral or written.

“Those who live according to the flesh—have their minds set on what the flesh desires,” (Romans 8:5). They are charmed with oratorical eloquence, catchy sayings, witty allusions, and amusing illustrations. On just such “husks”, do the religious “swine” feed!

But the penitent prodigal can find no nutriment therein! Men “of the world”—and they may be graduates from some “Bible Institute” or possessors of a diploma from some Bible Seminary, now styling themselves “preachers of the Gospel”—will speak of the things of the world and “the world hears them” (1 John 4:5). But those who are seeking to “work out their own salvation with fear and trembling” obtain no help therefrom, yes, they perceive clearly that such sermons and periodicals are “broken cisterns, which can hold no water” (Jer. 2:13).

“Take heed what you hear” and read! More than forty years ago the saintly Adolph Saphir wrote, “I think the fewer books we read—the better. It is like times of cholera, when we should only drink filtered water.” What would he say if he were on earth today and glanced over the deadly poison sent forth by the heterodox, and the lifeless rubbish put out by the orthodox? Christian reader, if you value the health of your soul, cease hearing and quit reading all that is lifeless, unctionless, powerless, no matter what prominent or popular name be attached thereto. Life is too short to waste valuable time on that which does not profit. Ninety-nine out of every hundred of the religious books, booklets, and magazines now being published, are not worth the paper on which they are printed!

To turn away from the lifeless preachers and publishers of the day—may involve a real cross. Your motives will be misconstrued, your words perverted, and your actions misinterpreted. The sharp arrows of false report will be directed against you. You will be called proud and self-righteous, because you refuse to fellowship empty professors. You will be termed censorious and bitter—if you condemn in plain speech—the subtle delusions of Satan. You will be dubbed narrow-minded and uncharitable, because you refuse to join in singing the praises of the “great” and “popular” men of the day. More and more, you will be made to painfully realize—that the path which leads unto eternal life is “narrow” and that FEW there are who find it. May the Lord be pleased to grant unto each of us—the hearing ear and obedient heart! “Take heed what you hear” and read!

 

Required Reading

 

One of the many positive impacts of a good seminary or bible college education is the required reading that many of the courses include. Many of the publications which are brought into your path you may not have otherwise encountered[1]. Sometimes, however, this can also be a drawback. A student may find themselves trudging through a book that wouldn’t normally have drawn their attention. Likewise, there may be books that would benefit your soul greatly to spend time going through, but due to the quantity of required reading, there is simply no “free-time” for these books. Fortunately, many of the courses I‘ve been privileged to take at Covenant Baptist Theological Seminary cross over these lines and have set before me many books that I have wanted to read or subjects that I have wanted to study and have done a good job of selected representative, quality publications. Below is a list of some of the courses I’ve either taken or am currently enrolled in and the required reading for each. I always enjoy getting the syllabus for a new class and finding out what the required books are. Perhaps this list may help you in building your own library or in reading books for particular subjects. I’ve graded some of these books (and there are excellent online articles mixed in as well): Green for Recommended; Orange for Informative but not necessarily must read; and Red for I wish I hadn’t been forced to read this. Thankfully, there are very few of the latter category.

Old Testament I (2 hrs; Dr. Bob Gonzeles):

Merrill, Eugene H., Mark F. Rooker, and Michael A. Grisanti. The World and the Word: An Introduction to the Old Testament. B & H Academic, 2011.

Kitchen, Kenneth A. On the Reliability of the Old Testament. Eerdmans, 2003.

Arnold, Bill T., and Bryan Beyer. Encountering the Old Testament: A Christian Survey. 2nd edition. Baker Academic, 2008.

Old Testament II (2 hrs; Dr. Bob Gonzales):

Merrill, Eugene H., Mark F. Rooker, and Michael A. Grisanti. The World and the Word: An Introduction to the Old Testament. B & H Academic, 2011. (Continued from OT I)

200 pages from an extensive supplemental reading list; I chose to read more from:Arnold, Bill T., and Bryan Beyer. Encountering the Old Testament: A Christian Survey. 2nd edition. Baker Academic, 2008. And excerpts from: Greidanus, Sidney. Preaching Christ from the Old Testament. Eerdmans, 1999.

Hermeneutics (3 hrs; Dr. Richard Barcellos):  

Baugh, S. M. “Hermeneutics and Biblical Theology” in Modern Reformation 2/2 (November-December 1993) http://www.bibleresearcher.com/baugh1.html

Beale, G. K. “Did Jesus and his Followers Preach the Right Doctrine from the Wrong Texts?” Themelios 14.3 (April 1989): 91-96. http://s3.amazonaws.com/tgc-documents/journal-issues/14.3_Beale.pdf

Beale, G.K. “Did Jesus and the Apostles Preach the Right Doctrine from the Wrong Text? Revisiting the Debate Seventeen Years Later in the Light of Peter Enns’ Book, Inspiration and Incarnation” in Themelios 32.1 (October 2006): 18-43 http://s3.amazonaws.com/tgc-documents/journal-issues/32.1_beale.pdf

Berkhof, Louis. Principles of Biblical Interpretation. Grand Rapids: Baker Book House, 1950 (various editions; 166pp.).

Carson, D. A. Exegetical Fallacies. Grand Rapids: Baker Book House, 1984 (various printings)

Foulkes, Francis. “The Acts of God: A Study of the Basis of Typology in the Old Testament” a paper delivered at a meeting convened by the Tyndale Fellowship for Biblical Research on July 1, 1955. http://www.biblicalstudies.org.uk/pdf/acts_of_god_foulkes.pdf

Glenny, W. Edward. “Typology: A Summary Of The Present Evangelical Discussion” in Journal of the Evangelical Theological Society 40:4 (March 1997): 627-38. http://www.biblicalstudies.org.uk/article_typology_glenny.html

Johnson, Dennis E. Him We Proclaim: Preaching Christ from All the Scriptures. Phillipsburg, NJ: P & R Publishing, 2007.

McCartney, Dan G. “Should we employ the hermeneutics of the New Testament writers?” a paper delivered at the annual meeting of the Evangelical Theological Society in 2003 (14pp.). http://www.bible-researcher.com/mccartney1.html

McCartney Dan and Clayton, Charles. Let the Reader Understand. Phillipsburg, NJ: P & R Publishing, 2002.

Poythress, Vern S. “The Presence of God Qualifying Our Notions of Grammatical-Historical Interpretation: Genesis 3:15 as a Test Case” in Journal of the Evangelical Theological Society 50/1 (2007): 87-103 (14pp.). http://www.frame-poythress.org/the-presence-of-god-qualifying-our-notions-ofgrammatical-historical-interpretation-genesis-315-as-a-test-case/

Poythress, Vern S. “What is Literal Interpretation?” in Reformed Perspectives Magazine, Volume 11, Number 29, July 19 to July 25 2009. http://reformedperspectives.org/articles/ver_poythress/ver_poythress.Literal.Interpretation.pdf

 

Symbolics (3 hrs; Dr. Samuel Waldron):             

Sam Waldron, A Modern Exposition of the 1689 Baptist Confession of Faith (Durham, England: Evangelical Press, 2009).

Wayne Grudem, Systematic Theology: An Introduction to Biblical Doctrine (Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 1994).

 

Historical I – Early Church History (3 hrs; Dr. Samuel Waldron):

N. R. Needham, 2000 Years of Christ’s Power: Part One—The Age of the Early Church Fathers, Revised and Updated (London: Grace Publications Trust, 2011).

J. N. D. Kelly, Early Christian Doctrines (New York: Harper & Row, 1978).

Hendrick F. Stander, Johannes P. Louw, Baptism in the Early Church (EP Books, 2004).

 

Historical II – Medieval Church History (3 hrs; Dr. Samuel Waldron):

Peter Brown, Augustine of Hippo: A Biography (Los Angeles: University of California Press, 1967).

Augustine, On Grace and Free Will; On Rebuke and Grace; On The Predestination of the Saints; On The Gift of Perseverance (Approximately 150 pages)

J. N. D. Kelly, Early Christian Doctrines (New York: Harper&Row, 1978).

Major Reformation Documents (150 pages):

  • The Council of Trent, 3rd to 6th Session
  • Augsburg Confession, First Part
  • Martin Luther, Preface to the Commentary on Galatians
  • John Calvin, The Institutes of the Christian Religion, Book 3, Chapter 1: The Things Spoken concerning Christ Profit Us by the Secret Working of the Spirit
  • The Canons of Dordt

 

Historical III – Modern Church History (3 hrs; Dr. Samuel Waldron):

Jaroslav Pelikan, The Christian Tradition: A History of the Development of Doctrine, Volume 5: Christian Doctrine and Modern Culture (since 1700) (University of Chicago Press, 1991).

J. Gresham Machen, Christianity and Liberalism (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1923).

The Great Commission: Evangelicals and the History of World Missions, edited by Martin Klauber and Scott Manetsch (B&H Publishing Group: Nashville, 2007).

Geoff Thomas, Ernest C. Reisinger: A Biography (Banner of Truth, 2002).

 

Doctrine of Last Things (2 hrs; Dr. Samuel Waldron):

Anthony Hoekema, The Bible and the Future

313 pages from Other Reading:

  • Kim Riddlebarger, A Case for Amillennialism (did not read)
  • Charles Hill, Regnum Caelorum (did not read)
  • Sam Waldron, Eschatology Made Simple
  • Sam Waldron, More of the End Times Made Simple
  • Sam Waldron, MacArthur’s Millennial Manifesto: A Friendly Response

 

Evangelism and Missions (3 hrs; Dr. David Sills):

Ashford, Bruce R. Theology and Practice of Mission: God, the Church, and the Nations. Nashville: B&H, 2011.

DeYoung, Kevin and Greg Gilbert. What Is the Mission of the Church?: Making Sense of Social Justice, Shalom, and the Great Commission. Wheaton: Crossway, 2011.

Piper, John. Let the Nations be Glad: The Supremacy of God in Missions. 3rd edition. Grand Rapids: Baker, 2010.

Sills, M. David. The Missionary Call: Find your place in God’s plan for the world. Chicago: Moody Publishers, 2008.

Sills, M. David. Reaching and Teaching: A call to Great Commission obedience. Chicago: Moody Publishers, 2010.

 

Doctrine of the Church (3 hrs; Dr. Samuel Waldron):

Edmund P. Clowney, The Church (Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press, 1995).

Who Runs the Church?: 4 View on Church Government, ed. Steven B. Cowan (Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 2004).

James Bannerman, The Church of Christ (2 volumes) (Edinburgh: The Banner of Truth Trust, 1974).

 

Reformed Baptist Covenant Theology (2 hrs; Dr. Fred Malone):

Palmer Robertson. The Christ of the Covenants (Philipsburg, N. J.: Presbyterian and Reformed Publishers, 1980).

Samuel E. Waldron. A Modern Exposition of the 1689 Baptist Confession of Faith (Durham, England: Evangelical Press, 1989).

Pascal Denault. The Distinctiveness of Baptist Covenant Theology (Birmingham: Solid Ground Christian Books, 2013).

Nehemiah Coxe and John Owen. Covenant Theology from Adam to Christ. (Palmdale, CA: Reformed Baptist Academic Press, 2004).

Samuel Bolton. True Bounds of Christian Freedom (London: The Banner of Truth Trust, 1647).

 

Biblical Theology I (3 hrs; Dr. Richard Barcellos)[2] :

Alexander, T. Desmond. From Eden to the New Jerusalem: An Introduction to Biblical Theology. Grand Rapids: Kregel Publications, 2008.

Beale, G. K. “Did Jesus and His Followers Preach the Right Doctrine from the Wrong Texts? An Examination of the Presuppositions of Jesus’ and the Apostles’ Exegetical Method” in G. K. Beale, Editor, The Right Doctrine from the Wrong Texts? Essays on the Use of the Old Testament in the New. Grand Rapids: Baker Books, 1994.

Dempster, Stephen G. Dominion and dynasty: A theology of the Hebrew Bible. Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press, 2003.

Foulkes, Francis. “The Acts of God: A Study of the Basis of Typology in the Old Testament” in G. K. Beale, Editor, The Right Doctrine from the Wrong Texts? Essays on the Use of the Old Testament in the New. Grand Rapids: Baker Books, 1994.

Goldsworthy, Graeme. Christ-Centered Biblical Theology: Hermeneutical Foundations and Principles. Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press, 2012. – Have not read this yet, but looks really good.

Thompson, Alan J. The Acts of the Risen Lord Jesus: Luke’s account of God’s unfolding plan. Downer’s Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press, 2011.

[1] This of course isn’t to say that one cannot read on the seminary or college level independent of the educational requirements. Most certainly, many can and do read broadly and widely, perhaps even more in quantity and quality than most academic institutions.

[2] Not yet enrolled, but I have begun the reading

 

The New Covenant Constitution of the Church and Arminianism

 

We come now to the third chapter and third major assertion set forth by Sam Waldron in A Reformed Baptist Manifesto, a defense of the New Covenant Constitution of the Church.  In the previous two chapters we looked at the contrasts between Reformed Baptists and 1.) Dispensationalism and 2.) Antinomianism.  Here we turn our attention towards Arminianism.

For those who may be unfamiliar, Arminianism is, generally, the belief that man has free-will to determine his own destiny, i.e. salvation.  It is most often contrasted with God’s sovereignty in salvation, or what is commonly called Calvinism.  For more on this, search either term on this site or head over to monergism.com for more comprehensive articles on the subject and a history of the controversy.  I hope to have a more informative post on the development of Calvinism soon.

Our purposes here will be to examine the arguments set forth by Dr. Waldron in his aforementioned book.  The point of this particular chapter, as set for by Waldron, is that “the origination, building, or source of the Church…through the instrument of the New Covenant” is God “the sole sovereign builder, originator, and author of the Church as a whole, and of its individual members.” Waldron then takes up three major theses to defend this assertion, again turning his attention to Jeremiah 31.

1.     The Sovereign Determination behind the New Covenant

To this point, Waldron examines the contrast between the Old and New Covenant.  Turning to Exodus 19:4-6 we see the stated terms of the Old Covenant:

“4 You yourselves have seen what I did to the Egyptians, and how I bore you on eagles’ wings and brought you to myself. Now therefore, if you will indeed obey my voice and keep my covenant, you shall be my treasured possession among all peoples, for all the earth is mine; and you shall be to me a kingdom of priests and a holy nation. These are the words that you shall speak to the people of Israel.”

What may be obvious in this passage is the simple “if-then” statement used by God in the extension of this covenant to Israel.  “If you obey…then you shall be My own possession.”  In striking contrast the New Covenant, as quoted in Jeremiah 31 contains no if-then statements but rather the dogmatic assurity of the Lord saying, “I will” numerously.  This is what Waldron indicates is the Sovereign determination behind the New Covenant.

2.    The Unbreakable Character of the New Covenant.

In this particular section, we see the emphasis of the breakable nature of the Old Covenant, particularly in Deut. 29:25-28; Ps. 78:10,11; Jer. 11:9,10; 22:6-9; 34:13; Ezek. 44:6-8.  Continuing to focus on the New Covenant of Jeremiah 31, Waldron cites the following passage to note the contrast between the breakable character of the Old Covenant and the unbreakable character of the New Covenant:

31 Behold, the days are coming, declares the Lord, when I will make a new covenant with the house of Israel and the house of Judah, 32 not like the covenant that I made with their fathers on the day when I took them by the hand to bring them out of the land of Egypt, my covenant that they broke, though I was their husband, declares the Lord.”  Jeremiah 31:31,32

The Old Covenant was written on breakable stone, and was broken as we have seen from the passages referenced above.  However, the promise of the New Covenant is that it is inscribed upon the hearts.  Lest one walk away thinking that the Old Covenant was somehow deficient or imperfect, Waldron points out that the real problem with the Old Covenant was with the people with whom it was made.  Citing Hebrews 8:8 he writes, “The Old Covenant did not secure the covenant keeping of those with whom it was made.  That was its fault.  Its fault was simply that it did not enable those with whom it was made to comply with its conditions.”  Conversely, the New Covenant supplies all that it demands through the regeneration of the heart, upon which the Covenant (law) is written and the presence of the Holy Spirit causes believers to walk according to the statutes and commands of God (See Ezek. 36).  Concluding this section, Waldron provides segue by asking, “How can God simply sweep aside the demands of His own justice and make a New Covenant like this with the house of Israel after their sins have brought upon them the fierce overflowing wrath of God?”

3.    The Mediatorial Guarantee of the New Covenant

This section begins with the promise that “God will forget the sins of His people and forgive their iniquities” given in Jeremiah 31:34, Waldron rightly points out this passage does not tell us how God will accomplish this, until Jeremiah 33:14-16, “14 Behold, the days are coming, declares the Lord, when I will fulfill the promise I made to the house of Israel and the house of Judah. 15 In those days and at that time I will cause a righteous Branch to spring up for David, and he shall execute justice and righteousness in the land. 16 In those days Judah will be saved, and Jerusalem will dwell securely. And this is the name by which it will be called: ‘The Lord is our righteousness.’”  Further, the book of Hebrews (see Hebrews 7:22) provides divine commentary and explanation of how God planned to bring about this forgiveness, namely through the work of Jesus Christ particularly His office as “both priest and sacrifice of the New Covenant” which “insures and secures the establishment of the New Covenant and the impartation of its blessings to God’s Israel.”[1]  As Waldron concludes, “Jesus’ priestly sacrifice of Himself, once-for-all, finally, and efficaciously fulfills the demands of God’s law and assures the forgiveness of sins for all who are part of the New Covenant people of God.”[2]

Concluding Lessons

In order to bring to conclusion this chapter, against the incompatibility of Arminianism and the New Covenant, Dr. Waldron briefly summarizes the points of Arminianism, i.e. the “system which teaches that man’s free will is sovereign in salvation.”

  1. God has chosen to save those who believe in Christ and persevere in obedience to Him to the end.
  2. Christ died for each and every man, but only those who believe benefit from His death.
  3. In order for men to believe in Christ, God must work by His grace in their heart.
  4. Though this grace is the source of all good in men, yet they may resist this grace and not be saved by it.
  5. Though God will provide everything that men need to persevere to the end, it is not certain that once a man believes in Christ unto salvation, he will persevere to the end and finally be saved.

He then goes on to contrast each of these points with the doctrines of grace, or what some have termed “Calvinism”.  Some of Waldron’s comments are briefly quoted below.

  1. Total Depravity – “We see the truth of total depravity in the contrast with the Old Covenant mentioned in our passage.  What the Old Covenant demanded was simply faith and obedience.”  However, “Every faculty of man’s soul is polluted with sin.  All men are unable to do anything of any spiritual good.  Even repentance and faith are impossible due to this total depravity and total inability.”
  2. Unconditional Election – “God’s covenant is not made with a nation that has proved itself worthy of His choice.  Rather, God, with sovereign, unchangeable purpose has chosen through the New Covenant to make them worthy of His choice.”
  3. Limited Atonement – “We have seen from the Scriptures that the cross of Jesus Christ is saving because of its connection with this covenant.  Jesus’ whole work was covenant work; His blood covenant blood, His priesthood covenant priesthood, His office as Mediator a covenant office.  The question about the scope, extent, or design of the death of Christ ought not to be answered, therefore, without reference to this covenant.”
  4. Irresistible Grace – “God actually writes His law upon the hearts of His people.”
  5. Perseverance of the Saints – “God remembers their [those in the New Covenant] sins no more” He therefore is faithful to the promises of His covenant.
Dr. Waldron concludes this chapter with several helpful thoughts about what we learn from the doctrines of grace in a practical, straightforward manner.  I hope to take a few posts to explain further the 5 points of Calvinism that Dr. Waldron introduces here.  Again, if you would like to purchase this brief, helpful work on the Reformed Baptist approach to the New Covenant see RPAP.  Also, I also recommend Dr. Waldron’s exposition on the 1689 London Baptist Confession, available on Amazon.


[1] Pg. 55

[2] Pg. 57