Sermon of the Week: 11/30/11 – Who do you think you are

The Doctrine of Election is an oft-misunderstood and always controversial subject.  In this sermon, Dr. Voddie Baucham expounds on election from Romans 9.  He challenges us to keep ourselves in proper perspective, as the clay, with the Almighty Creator, as the Potter.  It is a powerful message that goes to the heart of the Apostle Paul’s argument for God’s Sovereignty in Salvation in Romans 9:20. Whether you agree or disagree with election, the perspective of God as holy Creator and man as sinful creature is essential. 

2011.04.17.A Who Do You Think You Are – Voddie Baucham – 4181169361

3 thoughts on “Sermon of the Week: 11/30/11 – Who do you think you are”

  1. The problem with this in vogue theory of election is the false assumption that some people are not elected to be “Christians”. 1 Pt. 2:8b states that some have been elected to serve out their predestinated destiny of disobeying the message. There is no group which better fits the prediction in this verse than those who declare that it is they who have been elected to glorify God and enjoy him forever. Every person who is naturally born is not a child of God Jn. 1:13 “not by natural descent”, which is the truth that those who pontificate the theory of election cannot get around. If it were true that prior to the event of natural birth those elected to be a child of God has already taken place there is absolutely no reason for Jesus’ crucifixion. However “It is not those who hear the law who are righteous in God’s sight, but it is those who obey the law who will be declared righteous.” Rom. 2:13 Every proponent of the theory of election is actually teaching an objection against those stated facts. Every person in order to become born again of God must first hear the message which cuts into and destroys every particle of intrinsic value in formally held beliefs. But never is the truth heard from any teacher who proposes that the theory of election is true, and he along with his students always disobey the message as their predetermined destiny.

  2. Hi again Theodore. May I ask did you listen to the sermon? Or have you just provided a comment on your own presuppositions? I do not wish to entertain a debate on perhaps the most divisive doctrine in church history, but I would like to reply to your comment. I’m uncertain of the application you’re making with 1 Peter 2:8, but that aside the irony of using John 1:13 as your defense is that it disproves your position. You are correct that this passage teaches that natural birth has nothing to do with being a child of God (born not of blood), but notice also it’s not a product of human desire (will of the flesh nor will of man). How then can one be a child of God if they can’t do it through human will or desire? The last part of verse 13 tells us, it is by the will of God.

    The fundamental misunderstanding with the doctrine of election is that no one who denies it has ever responsibly explained how man, who is dead in sin (Eph. 2:1) can give spiritual life to themselves apart from regeneration of the Holy Spirit. Can man breathe spiritual life into himself or climb back into the womb (John 3:4)? No. In fact Romans 8:8 says those who are in the flesh cannot please God. So how can a spiritually dead sinner do anything to be saved when they are incapable of even pleasing God? Unless by Scripture and reason it can be explained how a spiritually dead man can give life to himself then I affirm election and give ALL glory to God for salvation.

    Thank you for the reply and please read my other reply to you on your out-of-context use of Romans 2:13.

    For the glory of His name,
    John

  3. One follow up, the death of Christ on the cross is absolutely necessary, otherwise there is no basis for justification, redemption, or reconciliation between God and man. Anyone who denies the necessity of Christs death on the cross is not a Christian regardless of their stance on election.

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